Berkeley pier (above): once led to ferry, now to fish [SF Chronicle]
Berkeley hit and run driver injures one, destroys two cars [Berkeley Voice]
Lawrence Berkeley Lab to build new research facility with $18m grant [SF Biz Times]
Credit card skimming scam suspected in Berkeley [SF Chronicle]
Berkeley climber tells of stranded partner on Mount Shasta [Oakland Tribune]

Photo of Berkeley pier by Paula Steele/Flickr creative commons.

Update 20.07: Reader Jenny Wenk adds this interesting footnote to the Chronicle’s Berkeley pier story: The S. F. Chronicle article on the Berkeley pier neglects an important bit of history. in 1960 or 1961 a fire started at the far end of the pier. My husband, who was night Harbor Master, and a friend of his with Model A pick up helped the Berkeley Fire Department get hoses, axes and other equipment out to the fire. Obviously driving several ton fire engines out the pier wasn’t a good idea since the fire was jumping from spot to spot. This explains the current state of the remains of the pier and why people can take their sail boats through some of the gaps. If they know the waters well.

Tracey Taylor

Tracey Taylor is co-founder of Berkeleyside and co-founder and editorial director of Cityside, the nonprofit parent to Berkeleyside and The Oaklandside. Before launching Berkeleyside, Tracey wrote for...

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5 Comments

  1. Great photo!
    I so rarely ever have my photos set as “Creative Commons”, and highly doubt I did in 2010, but whatever.  I am used to my photos being used that way.  But if it is going to be published, then please use my real name, thank you. Like many photographers / photojournalists, I am still a “starving artist”.
    Photographer:  Paula Steele

  2. As you leave the Marina the road is punctuated with bumps which are remnants of the original pier/ roadway for ferry service.
    I had always wondered if there was a good reason why the road had such big bumps so I finally stopped in the harbormaster office to ask. They explained that as the asphalt settles the old concrete ties become more exposed making for a bumpy ride.

  3. Also, the Chron article waxes enthusiastic about pier fishing in the Bay. Not a fisherman myself, but I understand that consuming such fish may pose a certain health hazard (which the article fails to note):

    San Francisco Bay supports beneficial uses, such as sport fishing and habitat for wildlife and endangered species. Fish tissue collected from San Francisco Bay often contains relatively high concentrations of mercury. The California Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment has issued fish consumption advisories warning people to limit their consumption of San Francisco Bay fish. In addition, studies have shown that birds consuming fish and other organisms from San Francisco Bay pass mercury to their eggs, potentially contributing to reproductive failures.

    The San Francisco Bay Mercury TMDL Project examines this water quality problem and identifies sources of mercury. Sources of mercury include runoff from historic mines, urban runoff, wastewater discharges, atmospheric deposition, and resuspension of historic deposits of mercury-laden sediment already in San Francisco Bay. Most of the historic mercury deposits date back to the Gold Rush of the 1800’s, when mercury was mined throughout the Coastal Range and used in the Sierra Nevada to extract gold. The single largest source is the Central Valley, where rivers carry mercury from remote regions of California to San Francisco Bay.

  4. The S. F. Chronicle article on the Berkeley pier neglects an important bit of history. in 1960 or 1961 a fire started at the far end of the pier. My husband, who was night Harbor Master, and a friend of his with Model A pick up helped the Berkeley Fire Department get hoses, axes and other equipment out to the fire. Obviously driving several ton fire engines out the pier wasn’t a good idea since the fire was jumping from spot to spot. This explains the current state of the remains of the pier and why people can take their sail boats through some of the gaps. If they know the waters well.