Berkeley teacher and school employee unions are hoping to take at least 10 bus loads of protesters to rally in Sacramento on Wednesday, April 21. The rally on the capitol lawn is expected to draw thousands of protesters from across the state, urging the reinstatement of the $2.5 billion in additional educational cuts announced for the 2010-11 budget in January. The governor will produce a revision of the 2010-11 budget on May 15.

“If we want to influence the May revise, we have to act before that date,” says Cathy Campbell, president of the Berkeley Federation of Teachers. “State revenues are coming in higher than expected. Under the provisions of Proposition 98, all of the $2.5 billion in additional cuts could be eliminated if the increased revenues are indeed a trend.”

The BFT is organizing Berkeley’s response together with the Berkeley Council of Classified Employees. The BFT and BCCE are hoping that parents and other people interested in the future of education in the state will join them for the rally.

The planned buses will leave Berkeley at 2:00 p.m., 2:15 p.m. and 2:30 p.m., to reach Sacramento in time for the 4:00 p.m. rally. At least two buses will leave from the Adult School, and Campbell said she is hoping to get support from students there, where programs will be affected should the cuts go through. Berkeley Unified School District superintendent Bill Huyett will allow teachers to leave at the same time as students on the Wednesday, which is an early release day, Campbell said. “It’s a real sign of their understanding of the issues,” she said. Teachers who do leave for the rally will be required to complete and document their professional development at some other time.

Photo of State Capitol by David Monniaux

Lance Knobel

Lance Knobel (co-founder) has been a journalist for nearly 40 years. Much of his career was in business journalism. He was editor-in-chief of both Management Today, the leading business magazine in Britain,...

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  1. Hopefully Cathy Campbell will support Berkeley teachers in other ways as well, such as demanding that BSEP monies go first and foremost to teachers and not support services at the high school such as parent resources, volunteer, media tech and drummer personnel. It would also be great (not to mention a long-standing union tradition) if she would support an equitable distribution of resources among the high school teachers, so that all teachers had the same number of students to teach. It’s quite surprising that a teacher’s union in a pro-labor town would allow some teachers to maintain a workload of fewer than 100 students and other teachers and their students to suffer with a workload of 150+ students.