Small example of stealth knitting in the Claremont neighborhood. Photo: Diana Baker

Citizen reporter Diana Baker spotted this cozy piece of yarn bombing near Star Grocery on Claremont Avenue, in front of Laszlo’s Furniture & Upholstery.

Tracey Taylor

Tracey Taylor is co-founder of Berkeleyside and co-founder and editorial director of Cityside, the nonprofit parent to Berkeleyside and The Oaklandside. Before launching Berkeleyside, Tracey wrote for...

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15 Comments

  1. Yep, but that only covers at most 2/3 of the complainers.  The remainder will decry a LACK of change.

  2. One way to check is to hold a lighter under it.  If it catches fire but just leaves an ash then then it’s probably wool.  If it melts, then it’s synthetic.  Either way you’ve fixed the problem.

  3.  Clearly someone is going to object if you put it up, or take it down.
    In Berkeley someone will object to any change at all, no matter what it is.

  4. Of course people will object, it’s Berkeley. I think you should still do it anyway, for the lulz.

  5. Okay, so let’s just make sure we’re all in agreement here — if I see a yarn mess on a pole that rubs my aesthetic the wrong way, nobody’s going to object if I shred it?

  6. “…they get ugly.  And fast.”

    Not unlike some Berkeley residents when anyone tries to anything useful, fun, or in any way different from what was happening in 1969.

    (If you see one that looks truly that bad, I’m pretty sure that the 60s would give us permission to use scissors. OK, safety scissors.)

  7. I like ’em. They are charming and whimsical.  And when they get old and ratty, they can either be removed or serve as a reminder that life and art are transient.

  8. I like ’em. They are charming and whimsical.  And when they get old and ratty, they can either be removed or serve as a reminder that life and art are transient.

  9. If you live near one you think is beyond its “sell” date, just take some scissors and remove it. It’s way better than graffiti, no repainting!

  10. It makes a good summer seasonal thing.

    In a normal spring, yarn bombs put up at this time of year would stay bright and fresh all summer long. But the unseasonal weather is really screwing things up this year.

  11. I like and support the ethic behind yarn bombing but the execution is lacking: after a couple of weeks and exposure to the elements the “bombs” look trashy and denigrate rather than enhance the aesthetic of which they’re made a part.

    In other words, they get ugly.  And fast.